An Insight into Visualization with New Media

LBAbstract

Volume 6  |  August 2019

LBAbstract

Volume 6  |  August 2019

Visualization with New Media

Jigna Hammers, Visualization Specialist

As Associate at Lantz-Boggio Architects, Jigna has worked in all phases of Architecture including Master Planning, Concept Design, Schematic Design, Design Development and Construction Documents. She has a specialization in Architectural Visualization, Animation and Virtual Reality and uses her skills in 3ds Max, V-Ray, Corona, Unity and Lumion to create high-quality renderings for LBA’s Senior Living Communities.

We asked Jigna to give us some insight into utilizing current visualization tools to maximize opportunities in design, development and marketing of buildings.

“When it comes to the power of architectural renderings, seeing is believing.”

Now, more than ever, renderings aren’t just pretty pictures to showcase in a portfolio-they’re a way to communicate and to connect with clients on a visceral level. From 2d renderings to VR goggles, architects now have a wide spectrum of tools capable of distilling their vision into something tangible that provides a true virtual experience of a building or space.

A single rendering can bring communities together, spark controversy, or help create the intended emotion of the project. Each of these outcomes are the result of people connecting with a rendering on a personal level. It’s important to know the ins and outs of dynamic architectural renderings to garner the best possible responses from clients or residents. 

At Lantz-Boggio Architects, architectural visualization is an integral part of all stages of the design and construction processes: generating design options, exploring more sustainable or economical designs, and visualizaing construction or service issues to maximize efficiencies in the cost and operations of the building. On the client’s side of things, this new generation of renderings has offered clients an eye-catching way to market projects to future investors or residents. The possibilities seem endless.

To the average layperson, visualization seems like a tool many industries have adopted as a way of keeping up with the times or simply because it’s widely attainable and in high demand. But, it is more than just a trendy boondoggle. Visualization in architecture is developing into an everyday tool in multiple aspects of project workflow and is proving to be more approachable than typical 2D drawings. Ultimately, this translates into more effective collaboration between the architects, interior designers, landscape architects, and the users they serve.

Like other forms of visualization media, the more details used, the more realistic and engaging the content becomes. Programs can go as far as tailoring reflections to a viewer’s personal perspective, geo-locating a model to depict accurate sunlight, modeling sidewalk control joints, and even simulating variations in grass height.

Visualization does not always need to be photorealistic for it to be effective. Even standing in a white box with a door can speak volumes to a person’s spatial understanding and can focus a person’s eye on how the space performs geometrically.

From there, much like the building itself, layers of information are added and work together to create an experience that is the closest a user can get to standing in a finished project.

What can designers do to make sure their renderings are as effective as possible? Well, if every picture tells a story, architects need to make sure their renderings are telling the right stories to the right audiences.

Since renderings are a way to connect with viewers, they also help set expectations, anticipate problems, and gauge client interest. Doing this before laying a single brick saves time and money down the road. Maintaining an open dialogue in the earliest stages of a project will ultimately improve client satisfaction and keep the budget slim.

Unleashing the benefits of architectural renderings demands both technical and interpersonal know-how. With the right understanding of both, architects can share their vision while fostering trust with those most impacted by their work.

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Christian Fussy explains a University Retirement Community

LBAbstract

Volume 5  |  June 2019

LBAbstract

Volume 5  |  June 2019

Christian Fussy explains the University-Based
Retirement Community

Principal, Senior Living Studio

Christian Fussy has over 20 years of international experience in the architectural profession working in all phases including programming, schematic design, design development, construction documents, and construction administration.

Christian, born and educated in Germany, has worked on complex projects in Europe, North America, South Africa, and the Far East. His diverse international experience includes a wide range of projects from single family to multi–family, hospitality and numerous Senior Living and Care campus programs. As a Lantz-Boggio team member for over 16 years, Christian’s experience with the design of Senior Living and Care Environments include Life Plan Communities, Skilled Nursing, Assisted Living, Independent Living and Special Care Environments. At LBA, Christian serves as Principal of the Senior Living Studio.

Based on the Boomer’s preference for individuality, I expect to see a rise in University-Based Retirement Communities. This is exciting for me personally, as I’ve seen the direct value of intergenerational communities at work in Germany.

“Young people inherently add dimension to the life of Senior residents while the Seniors add a positive effect on the college kids sharing their knowledge and wisdom that comes from a full life of experiences.”

Q: In what sector of Senior Living do you expect to see the most growth in the next few years?

A: One can’t talk about growth in the Senior Living industry without first mentioning the Baby Boomers. According to the U.S. Census Bureau’s 2017 National Population Projections, by 2030, all baby boomers will be older than age 65. We need to recognize that not only are there 70 million Boomers in the U.S. currently, but they are also not a homogeneous group. 

This population is extremely open to making a move to a Retirement Community as long as the move is for something better. They typically have the money and confidence to see their retirement as not the end of life, but a new beginning or a time to challenge themselves mentally and physically. They are looking for different Retirement models that fit this mentality.

Q: What is a University-Based Retirement Community?

A: A University-Based Retirement Community is a Senior Living option where Seniors have access to advanced educational options, often located on University campuses or extremely close by. The Communities themselves offer the perks that come with a college life: theater, classes, guest speakers, the library and most importantly, the fact that they are surrounded by young people. Young people inherently add dimension to the life of Senior residents while the Seniors add a positive effect on the college kids sharing their knowledge and wisdom that comes from a full life of experiences. The Seniors can also access the University’s fitness center, attend sporting events and in general, be a part of the University Community.

The University-Based Retirement Communities are typically smaller in scale than other models and only house 300 or so residents, which further enhances the community atmosphere. In addition, the smaller scale project encourages the participation of the Developer as well, as it can be easier and more economical to build. From all angles, it is a true intergenerational model that promotes the physical, spiritual and mental health desires of the Baby Boomers.

Q: What type of Senior Housing is available in these Communities?

A: With a lower entry age, the Communities themselves are set up to be able to fully transition each resident as their medical needs change over the years. The planned Communities usually include Independent Living, Assisted Living and even Skilled Nursing. There can also be access to University-based teaching hospitals as well.

Q: Any final thoughts before we sign off?

A: Whether we’re talking about University-Based Communities, suburban or urban locations, this is an exciting time in the Senior Living business. The changing preferences and expectations of newer generations of Seniors is causing us as designers and providers of Senior Environments to be ever-more responsive in the way we design and build the Senior Community. As an industry, we have seen great innovation in the design of these environments in recent years and I am excited about the future and the opportunity to create new designs and new products for our nation’s Seniors.

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Grand Opening of Skilled Nursing Care Center in Disney Celebration

LBAbstract

Volume 5  |  June 2019

LBAbstract

Volume 5  |  June 2019

Grand Opening of Disney Celebration

Skilled Nursing & Rehabilitation Care Center

in the Celebration Art Deco District, Florida

Celebration Skilled Nursing & Rehabilitation Care Center, just completed in May, is an 85,000 SF, 120-bed skilled nursing facility in the Disney Master Planned community of Celebration-Orlando, Florida.

The Owner, Advent Health, pairs each hospital with a Skilled Nursing Facility to offer a full range of rehabilitation and wellness for their clients. The residential setting of this facility is complemented with a host of outdoor spaces and amenities that are designed to be therapeutic for residents and inviting to families and friends. Outdoor dining, destination shade areas, therapy walks and healing gardens are included in the list of amenities that address not just the physical but the emotional and spiritual well-being of residents.

The person-centered care model programmed by Lantz-Boggio includes hospitality-style private rooms with private baths and mobile work desks that can serve as in-room dining tables for a home-like experience. 

“…As we look at our company and
the continuum of care it is really important that we look at the whole person and this facility has what the whole person needs.”

-AdventHealth Board Chairman

The home-like scale and intention extends outward as rooms are configured into small Households of 15. These Households maximize staff efficiency while providing smaller-scale group social and dining areas to de-scale the environment and create opportunities for residents to socialize and perform Household activities together.

Consistent with evidence-based design concepts for healing environments, each common area connects directly to generous outdoor living areas which is proven to promote the health and well-being of residents.

A full-service Physical Therapy facility is provided complete with large PT gym, exam rooms for Doctor consults, and state-of-the art Hydrotherapy similar to those used by professional sports clubs.

The fully equipped kitchen allows the chef to prepare everything from grab-and-go items to healthy gourmet fine-dining experiences to serve the four dining venues within the building and provide efficiency for in-room dining.

The building exceeds the strict health and safety standards of the Florida Agency for Health Care Administration (AHCA) while meeting the design and programming objectives established by the Owner and the Lantz-Boggio Design Team.

Lantz-Boggio was commended by the Disney review architect (Robert A.M. Stern Architects of New York City) for the quality and completeness of the design concept for the Disney Celebration Skilled Nursing and Rehabilitation Center.

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Meet Charlie Schmidt, Director of Design

LBAbstract

Volume 4  |  March 2019

LBAbstract

Volume 4  |  March 2019

A Q&A with Charlie Schmidt

Director of Design

With over 28 years of experience in the profession of architecture, Charlie oversees all aspects of Lantz-Boggio’s design department. His practice is focused on a collaborative design process for a diverse range of project types within the Senior Living and Care Industry. Charlie also leads the Lantz-Boggio innovation team. The team focuses on creative thinking and design concepts that best respond to the values and preferences of new and coming generations of Seniors.

Q: What is something that is often misunderstood or not fully appreciated in the design of Senior Living and Care Communities?

A:  One thing we focus on in the design process is the idea of place. Design which fosters a “sense of place” has a huge impact on our psyche and directly relates to satisfaction levels among residents and their families.

Yes, we create Senior Living Communities across the country and yes, this demographic needs many of the same amenities, unit sizes, as the community at large. What keeps it fresh and new is the fact that we are meeting the wide variety of functional needs on a different site, within a different community, and often utilizing a different design vernacular. We want to make each building belong to its physical site and architectural context so that the next generation of seniors feel like they still reside in their same community. This makes them feel safe and secure, even though some of their life circumstances have changed with age. We have the opportunity to mitigate some of their changes by creating places that comfortably fit in and feel like they belong to their unique location.

“We should remember that architecture is a very powerful tool to help residents feel at home and function normally.”

If we can accomplish a sense of normalcy through the “sense of place” that we create, we can allow residents to celebrate their life’s accomplishments to this point and take advantage of new opportunities for camaraderie and new life experiences in their community.

Q: What is it about architecture that inspires you to come to work every day? ?

A: What motivates me on a day-to-day basis is the process of architecture. I’m constantly observing the “process” as it’s happening so that we continually improve our work, and in doing so we advance the quality of our drawings and our buildings. As designers, we strive for the best solution to each individual problem, which invariably is the result of a very collaborative process. I like to say that I don’t care where or who the idea comes from, as long as it is a good one.

 

We embrace the idea that a collaborative process means knowing how to give and take criticism so the end result is truly better, because it is the sum of the best input we can bring to bear. Sometimes, the residents are our best critics. Being a critic doesn’t necessarily mean you always bring solutions, but rather, keen observation to identify and articulate where things are working well and where they need to improve. Great critique is focused and analytical without jumping ahead to quick fixes.

Q: What has changed in the profession of architecture since you began your career?

A: The biggest change in profession of architecture is how technology has sped up the design process. We’re able to generate design ideas very quickly which allows almost immediate reaction to the design – the feedback loop is much shorter. For example, we can quickly show you what it will feel like to walk through a space now in a 3D rendering. This makes the process of how we respond to design ideas and provide critique even more important, because compelling imagery can distract from the fundamentals – the blocking and tackling – that still has to happen to put together buildings that function on a high level. Once we have tested and agreed to the “bones” of a project, it is relatively quick to see what it looks and feel like.

This technology has also been amazing for potential residents during the sales process. Having a virtual reality tour of the new home they are considering can be exciting and tremendously comforting, as well as beneficial in closing the sale.

Q: Is there an experience you’ve had personally or with a client/residents that changed the way you view your work?

A: This industry is constantly changing. Each new generation of seniors come to our communities with a very different set of expectations and lifestyle preferences. Personally, I am working with my 83-year-old father who is a Senior Living candidate, but still lives alone in a large house in a small town in New Hampshire. I’m learning first-hand how important staying connected to community is to seniors and their reluctance to large scale changes in their lives. What becomes very real is the significant emotional side of the equation. We need to be sensitive to the emotional messages we are communicating throughout our environments – they are as important as meeting physical needs.

Q: What is the key to great architecture for Senior Living Communities?

A: There are many keys, but in the end, it is a balance between functions, efficiency and the many factors that contribute to making a unique, vibrant, and welcoming home for people. It takes an unrelenting desire to understand the values, desires, and preferences of the residents and their families. Secondly, we need to assure that the programming and design is carefully conceived in conjunction with the operations program. It is important to remember that architecture is only part of the total response that forms a successful Senior Living Community.

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Imagery and the Art of Interior Design

LBAbstract

Volume 3  |  January 2019

LBAbstract

Volume 3  |  January 2019

Imagery and the Art of Interior Design

A Q&A with MaryLou Parham

Director of Interior Design

Q: What is your approach to the design of Senior Living and Care Communities?

A: Interior design is about the messages that we send through design imagery. Each space has its unique purpose and function. The visual aesthetic and the image that we create is an overlay to the function of the space, and that’s the real art of interior design. We have to keep in mind that each new generation of Americans comes to senior living with a new and changing set of values, desires and preferences for their lifestyle and their homes. Great design accommodates and celebrates these preferences while keeping the interior spaces flexible and easily adaptable. Responsive design embraces this idea. The hospitality industry and a more contemporary aesthetic drive the character of our designs today.

Q: What are the major design influences shaping your work today?

A: Responsive senior environments today are very different than the senior community of ten years ago. Consumers are more discerning than ever before, they want a fresh and invigorating design that incorporates health spas, healthy food venues, spaces for a wider range of fitness, entertainment, social options, and meaningful outdoor spaces. The style, image and quality of the environment is more important than ever before.  Residents are looking for a design that is “Ageless” and incorporates the best from the non-senior society at large.

Q: Sounds great but how do you achieve this?

A: We team with the Architect, Owners, Operators and the Contractors so that we all clearly understand the purpose of the spaces, along with the uses and behaviors that are intended for each space. The process is then a multi-faceted creative effort involving the artistic use of details, materials, finishes, furnishings and lighting to create the image.Throughout the design process we also keep a close control of the pragmatic issues of constructability, durability, cost and schedule.

Q: How does your work in Senior Living differ from non-age oriented design?

A: As I mentioned earlier, from a “design aesthetic” there really is no difference. If we listen to our residents and families, the senior industry should promote “agelessness”, inclusion, community membership and normalcy. Our work responds directly to these values. Along with this, we utilize the power of Interior Design to help residents compensate for the physical losses that they experience as a result of natural aging. This “tactile” approach includes everything from optimizing lighting, to furniture, fixtures, colors and contrasts that help residents negotiate and self-accomplish within their environment. This is especially important in care levels of the senior industry.

Our approach to Interior Design has allowed us to provide some of the more responsive and compelling building interiors in the senior market.This is a consumer-driven industry and the senior consumer has become increasingly clear about their expectations and more demanding about their environments. I am excited for the future of senior living and how we can continue to be a part of its evolution.

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High Design for Lower Cost: “The Retreat”

LBAbstract

Volume 2  |  December 2018

LBAbstract

Volume 2  |  December 2018

High Design for Lower Cost:
“The Retreat” Assisted Living and Memory Care

Completed in 2018, “THE RETREAT” is a 70-unit Assisted Living and Memory Care Community built as a continuation of this non-profit Owner’s mission to provide cost-responsive housing and care for the local community. Lantz-Boggio Architects was able to deliver a design and construction solution that was 14% below average market construction costs.

 

“There is no magic formula for cost efficient buildings,” according to Charlie Schmidt, Principal-in-Charge of Design at Lantz-Boggio. There must be an intention throughout the design process to select and utilize materials and systems for maximum efficiency, while satisfying a changing consumer demand for higher quality environments. “Our designs are among the most consumer responsive in the industry and we achieve cost economies with a keep-it-simple approach to everything from the building’s structural and mechanical systems to the interior finishes. This approach results in a profound savings in the cost of the project without sacrificing the qualities needed for marketability.”

At The Retreat, “We utilized a simple modular dimensional system that allowed the entire building to be constructed with two floor joist shapes and two roof truss shapes.” Kitchens and bathrooms were standardized, room dimensions were established based on standard material and product dimensions to minimize waste and allow for speed of construction. Electrical and mechanical systems and fixtures were selected based on proven performance and economy. This repetition of systems and materials creates cost efficiencies in material and labor while shortening construction schedules and lowering construction loan interest costs.

“As construction costs continue to rise in America, we as designers and form-givers of housing for our nation’s Seniors are compelled to be more innovative in cost reduction strategies” said Schmidt.

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