The Ridge Pinehurst Wins Senior Housing News Award 2020

For the Third Year in a row,  Lantz-Boggio Architects has received a Senior Housing News awards

 

This year’s Award is for The Ridge Pinehurst under the Independent Living Category.

DENVER, COLORADO –  DECEMBER 2020:
Lantz-Boggio Architects is pleased to announce that our project, The Ridge Pinehurst, has won third place in the 2020 Senior Housing News Architects and Design Awards Independent Living Category. The 226 Unit independent living community located in Lakewood Colorado nestled between residential neighborhoods, Lakewood’s premier golf course, and a major commercial gateway to Lakewood with spectacular views of the Rocky Mountains.   This high-profile location and the rich public amenities and landscaped outdoor spaces combine to make The Ridge a focal point for the Seniors of Lakewood whether they live on or near The Ridge campus.

As careful observers, researchers, and leaders in the design of senior living communities for the next generation of aging Americans the design team utilized their collective knowledge as a basis for the program of the building in three key areas:  Connection to the outdoors, connection to the community and Social Connections between Residents.

Industry studies have shown that access to nature and an abundance of daylight are proven to promote psychological and physical wellbeing for residents.   In response, The Ridge Pinehurst was specifically designed to maximize opportunities for indoor-outdoor connections.  The floor-to-ceiling glass was strategically placed throughout the social and activity areas in a manner that optimizes views and access to the outdoors. Options for outdoor activities, ranging from nature paths to gardening, outdoor dining, games, fitness, and a variety of active and passive gathering and social areas are clearly connected and visible from the amenity and activity areas of the building.  Whether you are in an amenity space or unit looking into the courtyard or one that faces out to the mountains or golf course the connection to the outdoors is constant throughout The Ridge.

Surveys of newer generations of seniors emphasize their increasing desire for integration into the community as a whole. In response, The Ridge has an entry to their Health and Wellness that allows this to function as a public-facing independent business where guests, community members, or neighbors can visit the spa, gym, and pool. These amenities are sized to allow The Ridge to share their Health and Wellness resources with the greater community.   This extension of services is also an important outreach to the Active Adult community that lets them integrate with the community over time prior to becoming residents.

Lack of social connection has been shown in countless research studies to have a direct and negative impact on our physical and emotional well being but seniors are especially susceptible to these conditions.   Senior living communities like the Ridge that provide a variety of settings allow their residents to find their place.   Whether it be at the bar for a drink, the bistro for a coffee and a quick bite, or at one of the many dining venues The Ridge provides many social opportunities.  These dining venues are complemented by active learning spaces such as the Art Studio, multiple classrooms, and the game rooms where Seniors can find like-minded neighbors and together with an amazing staff build a culture and community unique to The Ridge.

The Ridge Pinehurst brought together several firms including AP Partners, the Owner of the project; Shaw Construction, overseeing the build; Capella Living Studios, as the Operator, Jirsa Hedrick for Structural, Wilson & Company for Civil, MEP Engineers for Mechanical/Plumbing, Alber Engineering for Electrical, StudioSIX5, Inc. for Interior Design and Lantz-Boggio Architects, as the project’s Architects.

Disney Celebration Wins First Place Award

 

 

 

 

 

Lantz-Boggio Architects’ Disney Celebration Care Center beats out over 100 communities across the country to win first place architecture and design award

DENVER, COLORADO – January 2020: Lantz-Boggio Architects is pleased to announce that our project, Disney Celebration Skilled Nursing and Rehabilitation Care Center, has won first place in the 2019 Senior Housing News Architecture and Design Awards Skilled Nursing/Post Acute category. The 120-bed care center is located on Celebration Boulevard at Disney Celebration, one of the most identifiable and iconic locations within metropolitan Orlando. The project has breathtaking views of Walt Disney World’s nightly fireworks show. 

The design team utilized research-based best practices, along with new discoveries in culture change for nursing environments and the latest research in consumer expectations as a basis for the program of the building. Disney Celebration was designed to respond directly to the team’s findings and to inspire meaningful lifestyles and experiences for newer generations of older Americans and their families. The architectural concept included utilizing “evidence-based design for healing environments” to incorporate design features and supports that optimize a therapeutic intent throughout the interior and exterior environment.

​The Town Center, which features Great Rooms, Cyber Lounge, Bistros and other hospitality spaces, was designed with floor-to-ceiling glass which affords access to protected outdoor courtyard and activity areas that offer a variety of experiences for residents and their families. Outdoor decks and balconies, covered outdoor participation areas, outdoor dining, walking paths, a water feature, fire pit and therapeutic landscaping materials are all included in the in the overall design to appeal to evolving lifestyle preferences for the outdoors.

Disney Celebration Care Center brought together several firms including: AdventHealth, the Owner of the project; Batson Cook Contractors, overseeing the build; Jirsa Hedrick Structural Engineers, the structural engineers on the project and LBA Interiors, as the project’s interior designer.

To learn more about this exciting award, visit https://shnawards.com/winners/ or call 321-337-7400 to reach the care center directly.

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An Insight into Visualization with New Media

LBAbstract

Volume 6  |  August 2019

LBAbstract

Volume 6  |  August 2019

Visualization with New Media

Jigna Hammers, Visualization Specialist

As Associate at Lantz-Boggio Architects, Jigna has worked in all phases of Architecture including Master Planning, Concept Design, Schematic Design, Design Development and Construction Documents. She has a specialization in Architectural Visualization, Animation and Virtual Reality and uses her skills in 3ds Max, V-Ray, Corona, Unity and Lumion to create high-quality renderings for LBA’s Senior Living Communities.

We asked Jigna to give us some insight into utilizing current visualization tools to maximize opportunities in design, development and marketing of buildings.

“When it comes to the power of architectural renderings, seeing is believing.”

Now, more than ever, renderings aren’t just pretty pictures to showcase in a portfolio-they’re a way to communicate and to connect with clients on a visceral level. From 2d renderings to VR goggles, architects now have a wide spectrum of tools capable of distilling their vision into something tangible that provides a true virtual experience of a building or space.

A single rendering can bring communities together, spark controversy, or help create the intended emotion of the project. Each of these outcomes are the result of people connecting with a rendering on a personal level. It’s important to know the ins and outs of dynamic architectural renderings to garner the best possible responses from clients or residents. 

At Lantz-Boggio Architects, architectural visualization is an integral part of all stages of the design and construction processes: generating design options, exploring more sustainable or economical designs, and visualizaing construction or service issues to maximize efficiencies in the cost and operations of the building. On the client’s side of things, this new generation of renderings has offered clients an eye-catching way to market projects to future investors or residents. The possibilities seem endless.

To the average layperson, visualization seems like a tool many industries have adopted as a way of keeping up with the times or simply because it’s widely attainable and in high demand. But, it is more than just a trendy boondoggle. Visualization in architecture is developing into an everyday tool in multiple aspects of project workflow and is proving to be more approachable than typical 2D drawings. Ultimately, this translates into more effective collaboration between the architects, interior designers, landscape architects, and the users they serve.

Like other forms of visualization media, the more details used, the more realistic and engaging the content becomes. Programs can go as far as tailoring reflections to a viewer’s personal perspective, geo-locating a model to depict accurate sunlight, modeling sidewalk control joints, and even simulating variations in grass height.

Visualization does not always need to be photorealistic for it to be effective. Even standing in a white box with a door can speak volumes to a person’s spatial understanding and can focus a person’s eye on how the space performs geometrically.

From there, much like the building itself, layers of information are added and work together to create an experience that is the closest a user can get to standing in a finished project.

What can designers do to make sure their renderings are as effective as possible? Well, if every picture tells a story, architects need to make sure their renderings are telling the right stories to the right audiences.

Since renderings are a way to connect with viewers, they also help set expectations, anticipate problems, and gauge client interest. Doing this before laying a single brick saves time and money down the road. Maintaining an open dialogue in the earliest stages of a project will ultimately improve client satisfaction and keep the budget slim.

Unleashing the benefits of architectural renderings demands both technical and interpersonal know-how. With the right understanding of both, architects can share their vision while fostering trust with those most impacted by their work.

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Heartis Buckhead on the cover of Seniors Housing Business

High-Rise Developers
Reach for the Sky

Seniors Housing Business Magazine  |  July 2019

High-Rise Developers
Reach for the Sky

Seniors Housing Business Magazine  |  July 2019

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Christian Fussy explains a University Retirement Community

LBAbstract

Volume 5  |  June 2019

LBAbstract

Volume 5  |  June 2019

Christian Fussy explains the University-Based
Retirement Community

Principal, Senior Living Studio

Christian Fussy has over 20 years of international experience in the architectural profession working in all phases including programming, schematic design, design development, construction documents, and construction administration.

Christian, born and educated in Germany, has worked on complex projects in Europe, North America, South Africa, and the Far East. His diverse international experience includes a wide range of projects from single family to multi–family, hospitality and numerous Senior Living and Care campus programs. As a Lantz-Boggio team member for over 16 years, Christian’s experience with the design of Senior Living and Care Environments include Life Plan Communities, Skilled Nursing, Assisted Living, Independent Living and Special Care Environments. At LBA, Christian serves as Principal of the Senior Living Studio.

Based on the Boomer’s preference for individuality, I expect to see a rise in University-Based Retirement Communities. This is exciting for me personally, as I’ve seen the direct value of intergenerational communities at work in Germany.

“Young people inherently add dimension to the life of Senior residents while the Seniors add a positive effect on the college kids sharing their knowledge and wisdom that comes from a full life of experiences.”

Q: In what sector of Senior Living do you expect to see the most growth in the next few years?

A: One can’t talk about growth in the Senior Living industry without first mentioning the Baby Boomers. According to the U.S. Census Bureau’s 2017 National Population Projections, by 2030, all baby boomers will be older than age 65. We need to recognize that not only are there 70 million Boomers in the U.S. currently, but they are also not a homogeneous group. 

This population is extremely open to making a move to a Retirement Community as long as the move is for something better. They typically have the money and confidence to see their retirement as not the end of life, but a new beginning or a time to challenge themselves mentally and physically. They are looking for different Retirement models that fit this mentality.

Q: What is a University-Based Retirement Community?

A: A University-Based Retirement Community is a Senior Living option where Seniors have access to advanced educational options, often located on University campuses or extremely close by. The Communities themselves offer the perks that come with a college life: theater, classes, guest speakers, the library and most importantly, the fact that they are surrounded by young people. Young people inherently add dimension to the life of Senior residents while the Seniors add a positive effect on the college kids sharing their knowledge and wisdom that comes from a full life of experiences. The Seniors can also access the University’s fitness center, attend sporting events and in general, be a part of the University Community.

The University-Based Retirement Communities are typically smaller in scale than other models and only house 300 or so residents, which further enhances the community atmosphere. In addition, the smaller scale project encourages the participation of the Developer as well, as it can be easier and more economical to build. From all angles, it is a true intergenerational model that promotes the physical, spiritual and mental health desires of the Baby Boomers.

Q: What type of Senior Housing is available in these Communities?

A: With a lower entry age, the Communities themselves are set up to be able to fully transition each resident as their medical needs change over the years. The planned Communities usually include Independent Living, Assisted Living and even Skilled Nursing. There can also be access to University-based teaching hospitals as well.

Q: Any final thoughts before we sign off?

A: Whether we’re talking about University-Based Communities, suburban or urban locations, this is an exciting time in the Senior Living business. The changing preferences and expectations of newer generations of Seniors is causing us as designers and providers of Senior Environments to be ever-more responsive in the way we design and build the Senior Community. As an industry, we have seen great innovation in the design of these environments in recent years and I am excited about the future and the opportunity to create new designs and new products for our nation’s Seniors.

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